How Will Valve Help to Shape the Future of Gaming and Linux?

This was originally an email I sent to someone else about Valve, I think that it merits being read publicly. I originally started typing about Valve and their relationship to Linux, but it all really centers around concerns about DRM and video game distribution control. I’d like to share my thoughts with everyone on this topic.

This is a posting about Valve’s intention’s for their development debugger for Linux and Steam OS.

I use Linux and love how Valve’s attention is helping to get things improved with certain elements of it, namely native games support. Some have posted before that the Valve Corporation uses misdirection (wheels on desks) and other people’s work (some of their games) to make their money while hiding their intentions publicly. I agree with that sentiment – sometimes. Steam OS will be open source, available to anyone and will help to make Linux a platform more friendly for game development and game releases. Valve’s aim, of course, is to control distribution of the games. An open source strategy will work perfectly for them since it will allow for Steam and all of their other work to be more easily spread. As long as it ties into Steam services or at least spreads word about in some form, it helps them to reach more people. In the end, Valve can do their bit of work and get plenty of other people to work on their software for free and still offer the Steam experience to everyone.

This places a player like me in an awkward/difficult position. I want more games of every sort to come to a single platform that meets most of my computing needs. For any company that can bring serious improvements to Linux gaming, I will want their attention and support. I show my seriousness with my spending, I spend my money solely on what I would like to support. The only problem is that my money (or Linux gamers money) is nowhere near as enticing as the money that Windows and Mac gamers spend. If Valve improves the viability of Linux as a third PC platform then that’s great, but if they control the distribution and convince everyone to target Steam as their distribution method then I might as well go back to Windows for gaming. I buy my games without DRM and plan to continue doing so. I have used Steam and still use it, but I have not purchased Steam games for myself in a long time.

I did break that stance last year to support some early games that I liked that released for Linux (Serious Sam 3 and a couple of other games, it broke a nearly 1-2 year hiatus of Steam spending). I immediately stopped after that first round of spending since I remembered that I hated the confines of drm. Valve using Linux to promote its’ distribution and game value sapping services is a blessing and plague all at once. They offer things that are good for gamers and developers in the short-term but it will harm everyone greatly over time. It’s great to buy a game cheaply, but is it great to seek an audience that will only buy games because they are cheap? Without being able to actually compel your audience on merit alone it is doomed to become unsustainable. The best (and possibly worst) part about this is that they don’t force anything on anyone (except for the drm), you have to opt-in on both sides of the equation, developer and gamer. People are so shortsighted (myself too sometimes). The devil doesn’t make you do anything, it just holds open the door. People need to stop walking through it no matter how good the other side may look if they value the future of gaming.

If I had to offer a solution I would just ask developers to make their work both on and off of Steam (without drm). This solution is actually being practiced now by quite a few developers and even publishers. Unfortunately, I am only a game player and not a developer. I don’t completely understand how companies are able to make profits and sustain them. At this moment I can only go by what I observe, I hope to eventually find and understand the source perfectly instead of going after the symptoms of the blight that I see in the industry. If it means anything, I’d like to present the words of Jeff Vogel from Spiderweb Software.

“In any place where your game is sold, pick the price that will maximize the profits. This ideal price changes depending on the nature of the place where it is being sold.

Steam is a big, sprawling gaming bazaar where practically all of the games are cheap. People see a game, spend a moderate amount of money on it, and try it out. People experiment there, and you need to charge a price that encourages customers to pick you as their experiment. Also, if you charge $20 for your game there, it will be on a list with ten good games at half the price, so you will get murdered.

Spiderweb Software’s web site, on the other hand, only lists our games. It is generally only visited by fans of role-playing games. People on our site are generally really interested in the specific sorts of games we sell, and so the higher price doesn’t scare them off.

This sort of logic isn’t my weird invention. It’s basic business. World of Goo is $20 on the company site, $10 on Steam, and $5on iTunes. Each marketplace has its own norms, and you price your game to maximize your earnings there.” – Source

DRM isn’t much of a deterrent to piracy anymore unless you go the extreme route of always online drm (successfully). I’d also like to share the content of a recent Ars Technica interview with Rambourg, the managing director of Good Old Games.
Wired.co.uk: Have you been tracking data or researching how DRM-free gaming impacts sales?
 
…GOG.com’s DRM-free, day-one release of The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings, a AAA+ game by any standards, is a great case study. At release, the version widely available on torrent sites was not the DRM-free GOG version but the one that posed any sort of challenge to the hackers, the one that included DRM…
 
…in our own experience we’ve found that trusting users to treat us well pays off and that our DRM-free approach is certainly not costing us business. Two of the many examples that come to mind: we see an average number of downloads per game that’s somewhere below two—which means that users aren’t taking advantage of DRM-free gaming to share accounts around.” – Source
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February’s Focus

I’ll keep this short and simple. The primary focus of gaming articles for February will be the creation, progression and growth of the Gaming Industry. 

People made games because hey, games are fun. Arcade machine’s became the first mainstream face of video games and were superseded by the consoles that followed them. Originally the consoles were for playing arcade games at home and in some cases tinkering and development. Eventually Game Console’s became their own thing and began to grow. We now have this hybridization of Arcade and PC gaming on Consoles. This is a very fascinating subject, I look forward to discussing it more with all of you this month.

Nintendo Releases a Rough Draft as a Final Product

http://www.gonintendo.com/content/uploads/images/E3/image_60348_thumb_wide930.jpg

The image above comes from Gonintendo, the first is the 2DS that I’m sure you’ve heard so much about by now. From right to left you have the following:

On the far right is the 3DS XL, the first semi-decent, next-gen handheld system from Nintendo. Its’ battery life is still undesirable, a joke compared to past Nintendo handhelds. It also still has the 3DS emphasis but is still solid and useful with a clamshell shape.

In the center is the 3DS, a piece of crap that barely lives long enough to let you know that it exists. Shoved into the lower corner of the system is the 2nd class citizen at Nintendo right now, also known as the dpad . Don’t forget about the afterthought, the backwards compatibility.  Very poor scaling is the name of its’ game, in combination with none 1:1 symmetrical screens – it’s a pos that should have remained a concept.

Very first is the 2DS, it’s a Ben Heck rough draft that Nintendo found. Nintendo heard us cry for a 3DS without 3D and a solid battery life and games but didn’t want to fulfill it properly. So instead they take something that Mr. Heck would not have ever released, maybe a joke that he scribbled on a napkin (This is just a joke, Ben does awesome work). From there they decide to release it under the guise of appealing to parents. You cannot protect the screens like the entire rest of the DS and 3DS line can do. You can not angle it like the rest of the DS and 3DS line. Heck, it looks like a cheap piece of crap. Not even the original DS Phat looked like crap.

I look at it and I see an anorexic Gameboy DS. In this use of “DS” it doesn’t mean “dual screens” or “developer’s system”. Oh not, it means “Dual-screened Slate”. It’s creative, it’s new and it’s totally unheard of. Instead of releasing something that fans could rally behind and love, they release a cheaply priced, mono sound reject in a very grudging and snide manner. Nintendo doesn’t care about its’ fan or its’ market. At least not beyond being able to do anything they want like a retired prude. We get the message Nintendo. You couldn’t publicly say F U to the fans so instead you released the Wii U. Wii U Nintendo. Wii U with a splintered broomstick.

More Details About Etrian Odyssey: Millenium Girl

Hit the link for full details, the most important one for me is the confirmation of having a classic mode. So in addition to having a new campaign/normal rpg style mode we also will have the original game included!

For those that have never heard of Etrian Odyssey (EO) I’ll give you a quick synopsis of the series. It’s essentially the digital, video game, version of tabletop rpg gaming. Think of the Parker Bros. Monopoly game. I hate playing the real game, even though I rock at it, because set up and clean up are such a drag. I like the video game versions because it streamlines or eliminates most of the tedium of playing Monopoly so that I can enjoy the actual game quicker that what would otherwise be available. The limitations of it being a video game are that I can’t place many custom rules or additions into the game like I can in the actual board game.

In EO you don’t have to set up the environment, roll dice or read through every description or work out many abstract things since a single experience is provided to players. You go into a dungeon with many levels, fight monsters, collect items/loot, map out the world and escape to save your progress. Your strength is directly measurable not just in your characters levels but also in how far you can safely make it through the labyrinth. Unlike a game like Final Fantasy XIII you have a great amount of freedom in how you may assemble your party and progress through the game. Your main goal is to just make it to the last level and create a map of the entire dungeon.

There is very little actual exposition or a main plot, at least not in how you may be conditioned to experience them in other rpgs or even Dungeons & Dragons (D&D). Unlike D&D, you can’t create your own missions or maps (just creating a map of an already created area). That would be a limitation of the game that I hope the series may eventually tackle. Even with that limitation it’s still a very rich and engaging experience. It’s actually one of the best not just on the DS or 3DS but period. It’s like the nerd version of a women’s Nike ad.

“Just you, your sword and the labyrinth. The monsters don’t care if you have acne, the npc’s won’t criticize your map making talents. You won’t have to argue about who’s paying for the pizza this session or where everyone is at. The game doesn’t make you set it up or clean it up. It can be called upon even at the twilight hour, on the bus or the porcelain throne. Etrian Odyssey, no bs – just fun.”