Tipping: A Very Brief Look at the Practice of Crowdsourcing an Employee’s Pay

So somehow a custom of tipping certain people in certain professions was taken into account for legally determining that this group of people be denied the same minimum wage of other people. Not only that but this custom is taxed and is even used to pay multiple workers in some cases. Now before I go much further I’ll give full disclosure. I generally tip between 10-20% based upon how much I can afford, the quality of the service, how unannoying the server is and how cute my server may be. With that being said, I have to agree with Mr. Pink below, the customer should not be leveraged as a variable in paying a customers salary in such an openly direct way.



If many delivery people and servers are really making around a third of minimum wage then I say that restaurant owners should either eat the costs or raise the persons wages instead of resorting to dirty tactics like trying to sneak a high tip onto the bill. The restaurant would only need to pull in between 5-9 more dollars an hour per server or delivery person. A moderately successful restaurant would be able to get that simply by receiving 1-2 more dollars per table every hour or by increasing the price of all menu items between about 3-10% based upon how much their business pulls in. This is assuming that average diner orders about 15-30 dollars worth of food with there normally being at least two diners to a table. This would turn the 30-60 a table to 33-66 a table. That’s not a horrible increase for diners in the least. It may cause less people to tip but in the end it at the very least will help to provide minimum wage or higher for servers.

What do you think, how does tipping affect your dining decisions and do you consider it appropriate to co-opt a voluntary custom to allow for business to not provide a livable wage for their employees?

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